Mary Branscombe (marypcb) wrote,
Mary Branscombe
marypcb

  • Mood:
  • Music:

Doors and valves and tiles

Wednesday

At last - a door on the bathroom rather than a sheet. I’d got rather used to the tent feel though. Some discussion of which way to have the door opening; so that you can go straight up the stairs or as I suggest, so that Simon can open the door and grab a towel from the airing cupboard when he gets out the shower. This has the disadvantage of blocking the stairs so I suspect the bathroom door will be shut rather more than previously. Significant light comes from underneath the door though, as being hung straight it now leaves a long triangle of space at the base where the floor is less straight. Wonder if we can give it the door equivalent of platform boots? Nice new brass hinges replace the horrible rusty metal ones we could never match the size of and luckily the hook is still on the inside of the door, but there is no lock so Simon gives Mark the plumber a flash when he walks in just as Simon is about to climb into the shower. Mark develops a habit of knocking loudly on every door before he tries to open it!


The shower tray is 900mm square (we couldn’t quite squeeze in a metre square) and it looked pretty big in the shop. It looks nearly as big on the floor and standing in it there seems to be enough room to wash my hair without banging my elbows. It’s about the only place to stand as the bathroom floor has come back up for the laying of pipework and plumbing, which looks wondrous intricate. The shower walls are half missing too, as the plywood has come off so Mark can fit the recessed shower valve that will let us choose between the overhead rose (six inches, 180 nozzles) and the shower handset (four functions from champagne rain to pummelling massage) on a hose and a riser rail.


The gable is neatly tiled and finished despite the rain and looks by far the best house in the street. As we dashed off to a meeting we looked up to see small Dave working on the gable with a sheet of ply to keep the rain off, that he pushes back when the sun comes out and pulls over again when the rain comes right back. The gable frame was always wood but the front was dodgy brickwork and the sloping edges were half bricks and roof tiles stuck together with concrete and it came apart in shoebox sized lumps. If that had fallen off the scaffolding HSE and the anonymous caller would have had something to worry about! The front is now wood too, the slates are beautifully laid and smooth, the ridge tiles look very swish and the clay tiles on the front (I forgot the name; they have a semi-circular shape at the bottom of each tile) look bright and cheerful. There’s leading down the sides of the gable and around the white beams that replace the building rubble and it looks brand new!
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 2 comments