Mary Branscombe (marypcb) wrote,
Mary Branscombe
marypcb

Is SkyDrive's service agreement what you'd expect from a free service?

Tim Anderson wonders if clause 13 of the Live T&Cs is bad news for Office Live. I wonder how much we expect for free just because it's online.

Clause 13 says Live comes with no warranty, guarantee or other certainties. So should you put data there? Yes, but you should never have only one copy of anything. Will Live lose your data? I doubt it. How do I know? Well, I think I'd quantify the danger of loss of data by looking at the details Microsoft publishes about how it runs the MSN data centres and how much of that practice is common with the way it runs the BPOS data centres. I'd compare it to the Danger setup on the basis that MSN is a system Microsoft has built up itself and uses to trial cloud strategies and Danger was something it bought in and didn't care about (and factor in my view of E&D as a division that doesn't manage follow through qv RROD). With respect to Dave I'd suggest that a free service is very different from a pay-for cloud service like Azure where Microsoft customers have already had changes, and where they have financially-backed SLAs, which a private cloud is going to have to do without. And then I'd think like a lawyer and assume that the purpose of clause 13 is to stop people treating the service as infallible and then suing Microsoft when they lose the only copy of their wedding photos or their dissertation or the spreadsheet they run their busness in. What's the service agreement for Google Docs or any other free cloud storage system and how much more protection does it offer?
Tags: business model, cloud, common sense, disaster recovery, technology
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